__________________________________________________________________________________

Columbus OB/GYN Information for Patients Regarding COVID-19

_________________________________________________________________________________

COVID 19:
Information for Our Recently Vaccinated Patients

__________________________________________________________________________

COVID-19 VACCINE – Scheduling Your Screening Mammogram

As you are scheduling your annual exam this Spring, timing can be more important than ever before!

The best advice is to schedule your screening mammogram either before you receive your  COVID-19  vaccine, or four to six weeks after you have received your vaccine.

As your body builds  a normal immune response to the virus through the vaccine, you may experience swelling in your lymph nodes.  This swelling is normal and expected, but  this temporary change can impact the results of your mammogram.

As always, self breast exams are important!  They help us monitor changes in our breasts and overall breast health.

If you notice changes in your breasts, please don’t hesitate to speak with your doctor or nurse practitioner about you concerns.  It is important to be aware of and to report any of the following changes:

Thickening or breast swelling, lumps or bumps
Irritation or dimpling of the skin
Redness or flaky skin on your nipple or breast
Nipple discharge, other  than breast milk
Changes in the size or shape of your breast
Breast pain

COVID-19 VACCINE – WHAT EVERY MOTHER SHOULD KNOW

Whether you are pregnant or a new mom, it is important to understand what we know today about COVID-19 vaccines. The researchers and experts in our field strongly recommend that pregnant women and lactating (nursing) moms have access to COVID-19 vaccine. If you are pregnant or nursing and want to learn more about the vaccines, talk with your doctor. You can discuss your risk of getting COVID-19 and your risk of severe illness if you get sick. We do know that a vaccine may protect you from severe illness, which helps both you and your baby. We also believe that there may be benefits to nursing babies who receive antibodies transferred through breast milk of their vaccinated mothers.

SHOULD I GET A COVID-19 VACCINE IF I AM TRYING TO GET PREGNANT?

The answer is yes. If you are planning or trying to get pregnant, you can get a COVID-19 vaccine. And there is no need to delay getting pregnant after you have the vaccine.

Some COIVD-19 vaccines will require two doses. If you find out that you are pregnant after you have received your first dose, you should still get the second does.

IF I DECIDE TO GET THE VACCINE, WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT?

It is common to feel side effects after getting a COVID-19 vaccine, especially after the second dose. You may feel like you have the flu for a few days. This is normal. Symptoms are usually mild. If you have a fever of other side effects, you can take acetaminophen, an over-the counter medication that is safe during pregnancy. If you are worried about your side effects or they last more than a few days, talk with your doctor.

Although you may experience some side effects, the vaccine cannot give you COVID-19. The vaccine does not contain a live virus but uses mRNA. mRNA vaccines work by telling your cells to make protein that helps protect you from COVID-19. Because the mRNA vaccines do not enter the nucleus of your cells, it does not affect your genes or DNA. And based on how they work, experts believe that there is no reason to think that they lead to any future problems with fertility.

A SPECIAL NOTE: WHO SHOULD NOT RECEIVE THE VACCINE?

While we believe in the safety and effectiveness of the vaccines, it is important to know that if you have a history of a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine or any injection you have received, you should not receive the Pfizer-BioNtech COVID 19 vaccine at this time.Information contained in this FAQ was compiled from the recommendations of the Women and Infant Clinical Guidance Council based on the guidance and advisements provided by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), The Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine and the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. While this information was developed by our doctors following the guidance of experts in our field. It is not meant to give specific medical advice and is for reference only. Medical Advice can and should be provided by your doctor or other healthcare professional.

ASK THE EXPERTS: YOUR HEALTH – COVID-19 AND PREGANCY

WHAT IS COVID-19?
COVID-19 is an illness that affects the lungs and breathing. It is caused by a new coronavirus. Symptoms may include fever, cough and trouble breathing. It also may cause stomach problems, like nausea and diarrhea. It is also important to know that COVID-19 may also cause a loss of your sense of taste or smell. Symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after you are exposed to the virus. Some people with COVID-19 have no symptoms or only mild symptoms, others may become seriously ill.

HOW DOES COVID-19 AFFECT PREGNANT WOMEN?
Researchers are still learning how COVID-19 affects pregnant women. Current reports suggest that pregnant women have a higher risk for more severe illness from COVID-19 than nonpregnant women. Reports note that:

  • Although the overall risk of severe illness in pregnant women is low, studies have shown that pregnant women are more likely than nonpregnant women to need care in an intensive care unit (ICU), to need a ventilator (for breathing support), or to have other serious complications from COVID-19.
  • Pregnant women with some health conditions, such as obesity and gestational diabetes, may have an even higher risk of severe illness, similar to nonpregnant women with these conditions.
  • Pregnant women who are Black or Hispanic have a higher rate of illness and death from COVID-19 than other pregnant women, but not because of biology. Black and Hispanic women are more likely to face social, health, and economic inequities that put them at greater risk of illness.

HOW CAN COVID-19 AFFECT MY BABY?
Because this coronavirus is new, researchers are learning more about the virus and the illness that it causes every day. Here are some important things that they know now:

  • Researchers have found a few cases of COVID-19 that may have been passed from the mother to her baby during pregnancy. These are rare, but worthy of mentioning.
  • Some studies suggest that there may be an increased risk of preterm (premature) birth and stillbirth for women with COVID-19. Other studies have found this not to be true. Because information is still limited, researchers are continuing to study the outcomes to better understand the effects of COVID-19 before birth.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I AM PREGANT AND THINK I HAVE COVID-19?
If you think you may have been exposed to the coronavirus and have a fever or cough, call your OBGYN or primary care provider for advice.

If you have emergency warning signs, call 911 or go to the hospital right away.
Emergency warning signs include:

  • Having a hard time breathing or shortness of breath (more than normal for your pregnancy).
  • Ongoing pain or pressure in your chest
  • Sudden confusion or being unable to respond to others
  • Blue lips or face

If you experience other symptoms that worry or bother you, call your doctor or 911.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I AM PREGNANT AND DIAGNOSED WITH COVID-19?
If you are pregnant and diagnosed with COVID-19, follow the advice of the CDC and your doctor. This includes:

  • Stay home except to get medical care.
  • Call on the phone before coming into the office.
  • Get medical care right away if you feel worse or think it is an emergency.
  • Separate yourself from other people in your home.
  • Wear a face mask when you are around other people and when you receive medical care.

I WANT TO GET PREGNANT. SHOULD I WAIT BECAUSE OF COVID-19?
Pregnancy is a very personal choice. It may be helpful to think about your health and your potential risk should you become ill with COVID-19. You and your doctor should talk about the latest research on possible increased risk of severe illness during your pregnancy and steps that you can take to prevent exposure to COVID both before and during pregnancy.

As you review what we know today, it is important to know that some reports suggest that pregnant women may be at higher risk for more severe illness than nonpregnant women. Pregnant women with certain health conditions such as gestational diabetes and obesity may also have greater risk of severe illness from COVID-19. And while it seems to be rare, there have been some reports that COVID-19 may have been passed from a mother to her baby during pregnancy.

Information contained in this FAQ was compiled from the recommendations of the Women and Infant Clinical Guidance Council based on the guidance and advisements provided by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), The Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine and the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine. While this information was developed by our doctors following the guidance of experts in our field. It is not meant to give specific medical advice and is for reference only. Medical Advice can and should be provided by your doctor or other healthcare professional.

 

A Little About Columbus OB-GYN…

New patients are always welcome at Columbus OB-GYN. We are pleased you have chosen us to be your health care provider. With our nine locations, twenty board-certified physicians and three certified nurse practitioners, we are certain that we will not only meet, but exceed your expectations. Offering a wide variety gynecological services as well the finest prenatal care we are positive that by choosing Columbus OB-GYN you are choosing the best.

Read more about our mission here.

gynecology-landing

Obstetrics

Learn More!
obstetrics-landing

Gynecology

Learn More!

Make an Appointment


    YesNo

    Testimonials - What People Are Saying About Us

    I went through menopausal 10 years ago. The typical symptoms are gone but vaginal dryness and the irritation it brings was a real problem for me. And compounded by the fact that my husband has erectile dysfunction due to prostate cancer, intercourse was difficult for us. Since my Mona Lisa procedure I am experiencing vaginal lubrication like I have not had in 10 years. And we were able to have successful intercourse after the 2nd treatment without messy gels or creams!

    Anne

    My doctor was Dr. Bloise he retired and since I have seen Dr. Simon and Susan Frost (Nurse Practitioner)
    Everyone that I have seen at this OBGYN have been wonderful, kind and caring.
    My relationships with this OBGYN started in 2000 when I moved to Columbus.
    Columbus Obstetricians Gynecologists, Inc. is great!

    Angie Jenkins
    More Quotes

    Special Services

    Functional Medicine

    Dr. Houser explains Functional Medicine and the benefits of approaching symptoms and recurring health issues by addressing the whole system to restore health.

    Learn More!

    MonaLisa Touch

    Dr. MonaLisa Touch explains the change in vaginal health and it happen majority of women. Now there's something you can do about it that is clinically proven to bring relief.

    Learn More!

    Make a Payment - Convenient and Secure

    You can make a secure online payment on your account using Phreesia.com. Just use the button below and follow the instructions. The entire process takes just a minute.